Study: LGBT women less likely to receive callbacks for interviews
Women job applicants with "LGBT indicators" in their resumes are 30% less likely to be invited to an interview than their similarly-qualified non-LGBT peers

A new study published in the academic journal Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, shows that openly LGBT women are significantly disadvantaged in the hiring process.  The article, “Discrimination Against Queer Women in the U.S. Workforce: A Résumé Audit Study,” was written by Emma Mishel, a doctoral student in sociology at New York University.

Mishel sent two sets of resumes to over 800 companies.  Applicants on both sets of resumes had very similar education backgrounds and work experience, although on one set applicants had previously been involved with an LGBT student organization.  The resumes with an LGBT indicator were 30% less likely to pass the screening process and receive a callback, according the study.

Resumes were submitted for openings in administrative, clerical, and secretarial positions in New York, Washington D.C., Tennessee, and Virginia.  Mishel told Fusion, “I was hoping to not find any evidence of discrimination so it is pretty shocking. Especially the 30% figure is pretty shocking to me.”  Five years ago a similar study showed that, compared with straight applicants, gay men were 40% less likely to be contacted for an interview.

Read Emma Mishel’s entire study in Socius

Read more coverage from Fusion

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