LGBT+ Business Climate Score

Out Leadership’s snapshot of the current state of affairs for LGBT+ people, through the lens of international business. The Business Climate Score score is out of ten possible points, and is based on ten independently verifiable indicators of the legal, cultural and business context for LGBT+ people.

7.5
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  • 10
1.
Are consensual homosexual acts between adults legal?
1
Yes
2.
Are marriage or civil unions for same-sex couples available?
0.5
Marriage is recognized nationwide but only performed in certain municipalities
3.
Is being LGBT+ punishable by death?
1
No
4.
Are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination in employment prohibited?
0.5
In some cases
5.
Can transgender people legally change their gender markers?
0.5
Regional
6.
Is sex reassignment surgery at birth for intersex children prohibited?
0
No
7.
Are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination in the provision of goods and services prohibited?
1
Yes
8.
Is there a U.S. State Department warning against travel for LGBT+ individuals?
1
No
9.
Do companies sponsor Pride?
1
Yes
10.
Are there laws prohibiting freedom for assembly or speech for LGBT+ people (i.e. “anti-propoganda laws”, media gags, etc)?
1
No
Talking Points
  • Despite marriage equality in the capital and a number of states and anti-discrimination protections nationwide, LGBT+ Mexicans still experience high rates of homophobia and violence. Effectively criminalizing homophobic violence would make it much easier for businesses to consider relocating their talented LGBT+ staff to Mexico.
  • While the Constitution protects against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, expanding legislation to explicitly include gender identity, and enforcing existing legislation, will make Mexico a more attractive country for foreign investment and tourism.
  • Mexico is a favored destination for LGBT+ tourists, who inject millions of dollars into the economy. Nationwide LGBT+ equality will ensure continued tourism revenues.
  • Based on conservative estimates, there are an estimated 8 million LGBT+ people in Mexico, with an estimated purchasing power of US $65 billion. Extending LGBT+ protections nationwide will ensure that both businesses and LGBT+ consumers can fully access the mercado rosa
Talking Points
Impact of LGBT Discrimination on Business and Talent
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    NO RISK
  • 2
    LOW RISK
  • 3
    MODERATE RISK
  • 4
    NOTABLE RISK
  • 5
    HIGH RISK
BRAND RISK
  • 2
    LOW RISK
There is little brand risk to operating in Mexico.
CLIENT RISK
  • 2
    LOW RISK
Mexico has taken important steps to recognize LGBT+ rights in recent years, and while homophobia and transphobia remain a problem, there is little risk of an international firm losing clients because it does business in Mexico.
TALENT RISK
  • 3
    MODERATE RISK
Pervasive anti-LGBT+ violence and homophobia in Mexico and the patchwork landscape of legislation may create challenges for companies seeking to relocate LGBT+ personnel to Mexico.
MARKETING RISK
  • 2
    LOW RISK
Despite significant homophobia and transphobia, there appears to be little risk to marketing to the LGBT+ community in Mexico. The LGBT market, worth over $65 billion USD by some estimates, has been nicknamed the “pink peso” or “mercado rosa.”
Socio-cultural Environment of LGBT People:

Status of LGBT+ Organizing and Community

  • — LGBT+ organizing in Mexico is largely decentralized, without one large organization leading the movement. However, there are many strong local movements operating throughout the country, with very little funding or leeway from local parties and Governments.
  • — The most prominent LGBT+ organizations focus on HIV (COMAC, Colectivo Sol), research and public policy (Fundación Arcoiris, Closet de Sor Juana, CODISE) and youth (It Gets Better Mexico, Jóvenes LGBT México).
  • — Visible and well-attended Pride Parades have occurred in Mexico City since 1979 and in Guadalajara since 1996. The visible center of the LGBT+ community is the Zona Rosa in Mexico City, where there are over 50 gay bars and dance clubs.
  • — The Youth Institute of Mexico City recently started to provide psychotherapy for LGBT+ youth.

Cultural Views of the LGBT+ Community

  • — While Mexico has made significant progress in recognizing LGBT+ rights, the laws prohibiting hate crimes based on sexual orientation or gender identity are not nationwide and are usually not enforced. Most cases go unpunished while anti-LGBT+ violence continues to be very high.
  • — 50% of LGBT+ people in Mexico consider discrimination to be the main problem they face, with workplace discrimination ranking second after discrimination in the media;
  • — Letra S, an LGBT+ media advocacy organization, estimates only 4% of LGBT+ people who experience discrimination report it.
  • — According to a 2013 survey, 55% of Mexicans support marriage equality, and 65-70% of Mexicans under 40 are supportive.
  • — Miguel Galan was the first openly gay politician to run for mayor in the country, in 2009. During his campaign his opponent, Gamaliel Ramirez, referred to Galan’s party as a “dirty party of degenerates” and said homosexual practices are “abnormal” and should be outlawed. Ramirez was subsequently chastised by his own party and forced to issue a written apology.
  • — Patria Jimenez became the first openly lesbian member of the Federal Congress in 1997. Benjamin Medrano became Mexico’s first openly gay mayor, elected in 2013 in Zacatecas, but did not commit to supporting LGBT+ rights. Since 1997, over 100 LGBT candidates have run in 4 different parties.
  • — Workplace discrimination continues to plague LGBT+ workers in Mexico. A study by Out Now Global consulting found that only 27% of LGBT+ people are out at work, with 32% having heard something homophobic at work in the past year.
Local Leaders Advocating for LGBT Equality

There are many openly LGBT+ activists and experts in Mexico. Out Leadership recommends:

Alex Orue
Regional Coordinator, Latin America, It Gets Better

Genaro Lozano
Academic at Universidad Iberoamericana and Author

Enrique Torre Molina
Communications Director of All Out

Francisco Robledo
Head of the Alliance for labor diversity and inclusion (Allianza por la Diversidad e inclusion Laboral)

Fernanda Garza
President, It Gets Better Mexico

Federación Mexicana de Empresarios LGBT (FME-LGBT)

LGBT Confex

Pride Connection